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LEGISLATIVE FRONT LINES

Mid-Year Scoreboard: State Legislative Victories

The 2022 state legislative sessions are in full swing and the SEMA Action Network (SAN) is working non-stop to ensure positive outcomes for our hobby. Below are highlights of the most hard-fought victories counted in the current legislative session. For the latest status on each effort and the complete list of this year's Legislative Action Alerts, visit semaSAN.com/Alerts:

  • The Kansas legislature passed a SAN-supported bill to allow full restoration of antique vehicles, including temporary removal of the vehicle identification number (VIN) when necessary. Sponsored by SEMA's 2021 Legislator of the Year Award winner Rep. Leo Delperdang, the bill was signed into law by Governor Laura Kelly.
  • A similar SAN-supported effort was successful in Arizona, where Governor Doug Ducey signed into law legislation allowing temporary removal of the VIN when necessary during the restoration of pre-1981 vehicles.
  • Following encouragement from enthusiasts in Kansas, Governor Kelly also signed into law a bill to allow older antique vehicles (60+ years old) the ability to forego a VIN inspection when applying for a title.
  • At the urging of the SAN, Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt signed into law pro-hobby legislation allowing the registration and titling of certain former military surplus vehicles for on-road use.
  • With the SAN's support, Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin signed into law a bill expanding the year of manufacture (YOM) license plate program for vehicles registered as antiques that will include plates from 1973 or thereafter. The prior cut-off was for 1972 or earlier models until now.
  • Thanks to the SAN's effort in New Hampshire, Governor Chris Sununu signed into law a proposal for antique vehicles authorizing the use of side-mounted exhaust pipes that meet certain requirements.
  • In Utah, Governor Spencer Cox signed into law SAN-supported legislation to exempt former military surplus vehicles from displaying a license. The new law requires a license plate to be carried inside the vehicle and ready for inspection by law enforcement upon request.